PAULINEMADETHIS Most of the bags in the shop are individual, one-off creations and many of them are made using upcycled fabrics in order to keep a happy environment. They are all hand signed. A percentage of all sales will be donated to charity. The charity for this year is the Bristol Children's Help Society (Registered charity number 1092921). So please click HERE to take a look at my shop where purchases can be made via the secure PayPal system. PaulineMadeThis is regularly at the Claverham Market in the village hall.
The Village The village is centred on the High Street where there is a Post Office [now closed], Claverham Stores [now a Pizza Takeaway] and Melanie's Hairdressers; and the adjoining Bishops Road where there is a Primary School and a village hall. St Barnabas Church is at the top of the High Street and the Free Church is situated in Claverham Road, a few hundred yards from the cross roads. This cross road, formed by the High Street, Chapel Lane, Bishops Road and Claverham Road is believed to be the site of the ancient Stalling's Cross - the market cross for Court de Wyck. (The former Chapel is thought to stand on the original site). Stalling's Cross may have been corrupted to become Stream Cross. Originally a farming hamlet, the village acts as a home to many commuters. However, it still retains its rural heritage and is surrounded by farms, horticultural businesses, market gardens and a small riding school. It is this patchwork of farms, fields, footpaths and winding lanes that gives Claverham its character. As with many villages in North Somerset, Claverham has a mixture of old local families and new arrivals. History Claverham is probably named after the clover fields which surrounded the village. In the West Country, the word 'ham' does not refer to a village or settlement, but is a contraction of the word 'hamm' meaning meadow. It is situated roughly half way between Weston-super-Mare and Bristol on the plain between the rivers Kenn, to the north, and Yeo to the south. Claverham is roughly five miles from the Bristol Channel as the crow flies. The village has two distinct geological sections. To the south Cadbury Hill, a limestone ridge, partly overlaid with clay, rises to some 250 feet. The rest of the area is a mixture of peat, estuarine alluvium and low hills of sand and gravel. The former swampy areas between Hillsea, Claverham Court and Claverham Road were drained by an interconnecting series of rhynes in the 1700s. The underlying geological structure has determined the development pattern of the village - but it is the impact of man, allied to the natural environment, which has given the surrounding countryside its patchwork of fields, hedges, walls and rhynes. Formation of the Village Claverham has probably been inhabited from Stone Age times when the moors would have been used for fishing and wild fowling. Trenches cut in the 1970s at Kenn revealed pieces of wood thought to have come from a track-way across the swamp. A Romano-British pot was found south of the railway line at Hillsea and Saxon pottery has also been found in the area. Although not strictly speaking in Claverham, there was a Roman Temple and an Iron Age Fort on Cadbury Hill. Prior to the Roman period (around 45AD) the area was mainly used for grazing, fishing and hunting. Drainage systems put in by the Romans, however, established a suitable environment for agriculture. Early history is sketchy. Before 1066 Claverham was held by Gunhilda. After the Norman Conquest it was held by the Bishop of Bath and Wells. At the time of the Doomsday survey, 'Claverham' was home to one Lord, one slave, three villagers and twelve smallholders. By 1450 there were 14 farms. The village was originally in two hamlets or tithings. The tithing of 'Claverham' was the area now known as Lower Claverham and centred round Claverham Court, while the High Street area was called 'Week' and centred round Court de Wyck. More recently, a third hamlet has grown up in the Stream Cross area. Claverham Court, originally the old Court House, now a farm, was built in the 15th century or possibly even earlier. A medieval two-light stone window still exists at the back of the hall. The house has a historic 17th century park and gardens. To the east of the house stands the original 15/16th century Tythe Barn, with its central cart entry and weathered buttresses. Nearby is a purpose built sheep wash. The original Court de Wyck was built before 1338. Between 1660 and 1670 it was enlarged and at the beginning of the 18th century it was considered one of the most magnificent properties in the area. However by 1814 it was virtually uninhabitable and was pulled down leaving only the l4th century chapel and the tythe barn intact.  The tythe barn was converted into a tannery in 1840. In 1970 it was taken over by The Imperial Tobacco Co. and its trademark tall chimney, a landmark for miles around, was demolished in the mid-1970s. The barn was twice gutted by fire - in 1898 and 1928. After the latter fire the south fascia was reconstructed from the original stone. Opposite the original entrance to Court de Wyck was the farmhouse of Bishop's Farm, first recorded in 1799 as being let to Edward Ash. By 1821 the present house had been built in the "homeground". Over the next 200 years farm houses and cottages were slowly added, but the next major change came with the drainage of the low lying, peaty land between Claverham Court and Little River. In 1750/1 a private agreement led to the early enclosure of some 200 acres at Claverham Common. The enclosure was allocated to people in proportion to the number of shares (or grazing rights) they held on the Common. The area known as Hare Mead, some 32 acres, was made into a Decoy Pool. The land was divided into fields enclosed by rhynes, which act as boundaries, watering for livestock and a drainage system. The Parliamentary Enclosure Act caused further drainage to take place. During 1810-1815 Kenn Moor was drained to the west of Kenn Moor Gate (there literally was a gate here). It was at this time that the droves, including Claverham Drove (originally called Claverham Road) were laid out across the moors. Because of the peat foundation, the roads are laid on faggots, which gives them their characteristic springy feel. The census of 1851 shows there were 71 dwellings in the village and 14 farms. Out of 476 inhabitants a quarter were employed in farming. A few were coal miners, who may have worked down the Claverham mine. There were two shops - a butchers and a general store. Although there was no inn there was a beer house keeper near Claverham Green Farm and a cider house keeper at Mead Mills at the end of Hunt's Lane. The picture "The top of the High Street" shows the area as it is today, compared with the picture the early 1900's shown earlier. Eighteen properties were situated between Cottage Farm at the top of the High Street and Streamcross Villa. Several remain including Court de Wyck Cottages. Historic Properties Claverham is richly endowed with historic properties. Claverham Court is believed to be the earliest building still existing, but this and some of the other farms were probably built on the sites of even older properties. They include: Rose Farm in Stream Cross, was originally a medieval house with an open hearth. The ceiling, fireplace and stairs were probably added in the l6th century. Home Farm (formerly Foord Farm) A 15th century single storey open hall house, with the smoke escaping through a hole in the thatched roof. The blackened roof timbers still remain, but the thatched roof was replaced in the mid 20th century. Ceiling, fireplaces and stairs were added in the l6th century. Lower Farm (formerly Old Farm), Jasmine Lane. This property dates from mid l6th Century, is built on the same plan and construction as Home Farm and Rose Farm. Jasmine Lane was originally called Old Farm Lane. Grove Farm, Brockley Way, is late l6th/early 17th century with later alterations and additions. It is built of stone and has two large, external chimneystacks. The gable porch has a very old studded front door with raised hinges and the doorframe has been cut to allow barrels to be taken into the house. Claverham Green Farm, Brockley Way: The date on the chimney is 1721, but it is probably of an earlier construction with 19th century alterations. Built of stone and rendered, the roof is pantiled with brick chimneys. Claverham House, Stream Cross: Built in 1744 with mid 19th century alterations, it is built of stone with a limestone dressing. It has an interesting 19th century porch with pilasters on pedestals. In the 18th century gardens there is a ha-ha, as have at least three other properties in the village. A ha-ha is a ditch, often with a low wall inside it, which divides areas of land and forms a barrier to animals without interrupting the view. Chestnut Farm, Lower Claverham, The earliest part is mid 17th century. It was refronted in the 18th century and has early 19th century alterations. Built of stone and rendered, it has a pantiled roof and a fine studded door with hinge straps. Manor Farm, Stream Cross, appears to be early 17th century, but the hall and stairs in a turret could mean an earlier date. Built of stone and rendered, with a pantiled roof and gabled chimneystacks, it has 18th century alterations. Oakfield, Meeting House Lane: Built in the early 17th century, it was remodelled in the 18th century and the rear wing was added in the early 19th century. Construction is stone and render. Cottage Farm, Brockley Way: Built before 1800 of stone and rendered, the front has recently been cleared of render and re-pointed. Originally a single thatched building, it has been added to at the front and rear. In the 19th century there was a coalmine behind the house. The shaft reappeared during the last war but was filled in to prevent accidents. White Cottage, Jasmine Lane: An early 19th century front, probably of a much older building, with 20th century alterations. Attached at an angle and incorporated into the house is a former pigsty. The house is stone, rendered and painted white with a pantiled roof. The Post Office, High Street: 19th century with the main door originally opening at the side onto the road. Stone and rendered. Sweet Briar Cottages, Lower Claverham: Older than 1650, when the deeds show the property changed hands. Stone and rendered. Streamcross Villa, Claverham Road: Probably late 18th century (shown on a survey map of 1799). It is one of the oldest properties on Claverham Road. Until fairly recently it was a general shop. Stone built and rendered. Churches The earliest known church (or free chapel), which was dedicated to St Swithin, was built near Claverham Court before 1326. All traces of the building disappeared in the l600s, but it is thought to have been built on the field called Chappie Hays. The Friends Meeting House, in Meeting House Lane, was built on a half-acre plot given to the Friends by Richard Dawson in 1673. This was at a time when persecution of the Quakers was intense. After the Act of Toleration the Friends obtained a licence to hold meetings in a named Meeting House. By 1729 the numbers had grown and the House was rebuilt and extended to create an attractive natural stone property. (In that same year one of the Friends, Richard Durban left a bequest in trust for a school in Yatton for poor children). In 1932 the property was given to the Friends Historical Society to administer. In 1991 a Claverham Trust was set up to buy back the property and undertake a major building project including re- rendering the outside. Behind the property is a burial ground. The Methodist Church at the end of Chapel Lane was built in 1867 It was closed in 1972 and converted into two properties in 1978. St. Barnabas Church, which was originally called the Mission Room and Busy Bee, was built in 1879 on land donated by John Cox and family. A daughter church of St Mary's, Yatton, it was opened to counter the three 'public houses' in the remoter parts of Claverham. The Free Evangelical Church at the corner of Streamcross was built in 1927 - only eight months after parishioners, who did not agree with the Minister at the Methodist Church, decided to form their own group. A clubroom was later added at the rear. Barns and Walls The village is also rich in old farm buildings, barns and walls made of local stone. Mellowed over the centuries, they add to the texture of the village. The tythe barn at Claverham Court is 15th/l6th century construction, 17 metres long and stands 7 metres high. A variety of buildings at Rose Farm show the transition from local stone used in the 18th and 19th centuries to the brick ones of the early part of the 20th century. At Chestnut Farm, the range of natural stone buildings, which Include a cider house, run along the side of the road for 80 metres. Several redundant barns have been converted to attractive homes, thus preserving them. The new village hall has been built in the style of a Somerset barn to ensure it blends in with the adjacent historic buildings. There are also many 'stand alone' stonewalls, the most important being those at Claverham House, Court de Wyck, Walnut Bank and 'Parman'. The curved garden wall at Walnut Bank is probably the highest at three metres. The walls adjoining the chapel at Court de Wyck are probably the oldest in the village. There are several walled gardens in Claverham. Although the garden wall at Green Farm has been demolished, the wall outside the refurbished Yew Tree Cottages has been rebuilt using the original stone. Up until 1900 the majority of properties in the village were built of dressed stone or limestone rubble and render, with gables. Recently the render has been removed from some properties and the stonework re-pointed. Development The modern development in the village started in the 1930's with local authority housing along Claverham Road. These followed the traditional style of render and gables. Further local authority housing followed in Broadcroft Avenue, then around twenty years later in Claverham Park. Again they followed the village style. The last local authority homes to be added were the retirement bungalows in 1984, but this time they were brick built. The first private housing developments started in the 1960s. Over the next ten years, Whitehouse Road, Hollowmead Close, Franklin's Way, Chestnut Drive, Dunsters Road and Anvil Road were built. These have followed a variety of styles and are mainly of brick or imitation natural stone. None of these estates exceeded 35 in number and the ten-year time scale allowed them to be absorbed into the village. In 1997 five dark red brick houses in Orchard Court were built. This is a sensitive site right in the heart of the village. Originally the developers wanted to pull down the three derelict cottages known as Yew Tree House, which dates from the l6th century or earlier. However villagers felt that this would destroy the character of the High Street and after a sustained campaign the planners agreed they should be retained and renovated. Strikingly, individual houses which have been built over the past five years, have stuck to the village style of rendered cottage. There are a wide variety of properties along Claverham Road and the High Street; all built at different times and with varying styles, however, several incorporate gables. Natural Environment The attractive network of lanes, bridleways and footpaths, which allows access to the countryside surrounding the village, is one of the reasons why so many people like living in Claverham. Most properties either look out onto fields or are within easy reach of them. Apart from Claverham Road, all access roads to the village are through farmland. Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI): The moors are more than an attractive place to walk - they are a vital conservation area on our doorstep. The importance of the natural flora and fauna of the moors was recognized in 1995 when a large area - from Nailsea Wall across Kenn Moor to the railway line - was designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The local area has undergone many changes since the end of the last ice age. Changes in sea levels have laid down layers of silt and peat. Clay occurs to the west of the area, and in some places this has become mixed with the peat. The varying soil types and farming practices, along with the drainage systems, have resulted in a wide range of rhynes and ditches, each supporting exceptionally rich plant communities such as Frogbit and Unbranched Bur-reed as well as the nationally scarce Hairlike and Fern Pondweed and Whorled Water-milfoil. Many emergent species are also present such as Tubular Water-dropwort and the Flowering Rush. In some places the brackish nature of the area, before drainage, is still reflected in some of the plants such as Club- rush and Grey Club-rush. Some of the less frequently dredged ditches are dominated by extensive stands of yellow Iris, Reed Sweet Grass and Common Reed while the banks support Ragged Robin, Marsh Marigolds and Creeping Jenny. There is an equally diverse invertebrate fauna, many of them now nationally rare, including the Hairy Dragonfly and the Variable Damselfly, Britain's largest Water Beetle - the Great Silver Water Beetle - the Pea Mussel and the Soldier Ply. Amphibians such as frogs, toads and newts all breed in the area along with reptiles such as grass snakes and slow worms. Of the bird population, the Bewick Swans and herons predominate, but curlews, skylarks, lapwings, kestrels, buzzards, mallards, moorhens and the occasional kingfisher can all be seen, as well as sea birds, woodpeckers, blackbirds and song thrushes (though these are sadly in decline). Mammals include foxes, badgers, rabbits, hares, grey squirrels, roe deer, and bats. The complex web of ditches drain into the Little River, Westmead Rhyne, Blackditch Rhyne and Claverham Rhyne (Tan Ditch). These are connected to the River Kenn and Blind Yeo via Claverham Drove Rhyne and Decoy Pool Rhyne. The management of this diverse habitat is finely balanced and current practice has evolved over several generations of drainage engineers, farmers and, more recently, conservationists (the water- logged structure of the Inner Moors is of archaeological interest as these conditions preserve organic remains of wood and leather). In the past, those holding rights of common on Kenn Moor were obliged to maintain the rhynes and rivers and they could be fined for neglecting their duties or damaging the banks. Alterations to the water table can have extreme effects such as in the summer of 1896 when between 200 and 300 acres of land sank. Cracks 20-30 yards long and holes 3-4ft deep and 7ft across appeared. This was blamed on Chelvey Pumping Station abstracting too much water. To counteract this a dam was built on the River Yeo at Wemberham to hold back the water on the moors. There was also a pumping station in Chapel Lane. Given the current trend towards wetter winters and the consequent high water table, anything that would add to the potential for flooding should be avoided. Farms It must not be forgotten that the fields are a green factory. Cattle and sheep predominate in this area. There are dairy farms and beef and sheep rearing ones. Some cereal crops are grown, but fields are mainly cut for hay and silage. There are also agricultural contractors some of whom farm as well. There are concerns that if farms cease to remain viable there will be increased pressure to allow building or further industrial development. Orchards have also been diminishing. Some have been removed including one at Court de Wyck, others have died off and not been replaced. One remains near Oakfield, which still produces apples and also provides a habitat for the Green and Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers as well as owls. New orchards are being planted. A cider apple orchard has been replanted on land at Brockley Way where the old cottage stood, and a small orchard has been planted at Walnut Bank. Ponds Ponds provide an important habitat for flora and fauna as well as acting as natural reservoirs for excess water. There are more than 15 ponds and pools in Claverham. Many are natural but several have been man-made, either to provide drinking water for livestock, a habitat for wildlife or as a water feature. These include one created ten years ago by Clevedon Gun Club on marshland between Walnut Bank and the railway line. More recently a wildlife pond has been created at Court de Wyck School. There are two ponds at Hillsea one of which is a dew pond. Ponds at Claverham Green Farm were used by drovers who stayed overnight to rest and water their animals and also for washing purposes - hence the name 'washing pound'. Several ponds have been filled in, some deliberately others by natural processes. The decoy pool near Little River which was created in 1750 is not shown on the 1841 Tythe Map, but five fields have the word Decoy Pool in their names. Bungalows now cover the duck pond in the High Street. The bog and adjacent marshland in Chapel Lane have also been filled in. The loss of these natural reservoirs, which allow excess rainwater to seep away slowly, could be a contributory cause of flooding such as that seen at the end of Chapel Lane in 2001. The loss of the only bog area in Claverham has also denuded the village of important wildlife. Trees Nothing enhances a landscape more than trees. Although there is no large area of woodland in the village it is rich in trees - not only in hedgerows and fields, but in private gardens as well. One of the major changes to the look of the landscape has been the loss of thousands of majestic Elms due to Dutch Elm disease. Semi-mature elms are still being lost today. However Claverham still has many native trees, with ash and oak predominating on the higher ground, while pollarded willows line the rhynes on the moors. Several specimen trees already have Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs) on them. These include 13 trees at Court de Wyck (Claverham Ltd) namely a lime (which replaced a pine), Scots Pines, Sycamores, Horse Chestnuts (two of which were planted by the daughters of the Millwards 90 years ago) and a Holm Oak. The land also supports Copper Beech, Walnuts, Somerset Firs, a 30-year-old Magnolia, 60-year-old Mulberry and a Ginkgo Tree as well as the usual Ash etc. In the High Street, a Willow and Silver Birch have TPOs, and a Lime is included in a landscape order at Ivy Cottage. There is also a TPO on a Walnut Tree in Claverham Park. Other important trees include eleven Walnut trees at Claverham Court and the Chestnut tree at Grove Farm, which is a third generation from a specimen tree between Henley Lane and Cadbury Country Club. Hedges Hedges not only act as boundaries to fields and form wildlife habitats but they are living connections to the past. To former generations, hedges were of great importance as a source of food, fuel and medicine as well as acting as a shelter to livestock and crops, a soil stabilizer and a windbreak.  Forming a complete wild life eco-system, half of our native mammals, all of our reptiles and a fifth of the bird population can be found in the hedgerows. Over a thousand species of wild flowers can also be found there - more varieties than in woods or on heath lands.  Hedges still predominate in Claverham as boundaries to fields and farms as well as edges to lanes. Remnants of these field hedges can also be found in some of the residential areas.  Once a hedge has been created it is totally sustainable, enduring year after year and increasing in diversity, and it is this diversity which provides a clue to its origins. It has been calculated that the number of shrub species per 30- yard hedge is roughly equal to its age in hundreds of years.  The hedge alongside the road at Walnut Bank has been verified as having Tudor origins from the number of species in it.  Many of the other hedges date back to the time of the Enclosure Acts of the 18th and 19th centuries.  Part of the hedge in Meeting House Lane contains small leaf Lime, which is a living link with Mesolithic times. A sticky, woodland tree, which is not normally used in hedges, it is an indicator of a 'woodland ghost' where the hedge has been formed from trees growing in the original forest which covered the area.  At one time hedges were closely protected and raids on them by parishioners were severely punished and could carry the penalty of transportation.  Until 20 years ago, hedges were managed in a sustainable way by hand. Cutting and laying ensured strong new growths. However, modern practices of annual flaying by mechanical cutters can kill a hedge. Disease can enter through the jagged tears and the mulch of debris at the base of the hedge can stop new growth. Open Spaces The only open space in the centre of the village is the Broadcroft Playing Field. Just outside the village fence is Cadbury Hill, part of which is jointly managed by Yatton and Congresbury Parish Councils. The nearest large open spaces are at Hangstones, Yatton and Cleeve playing fields. Claverham enjoys a diversity of scenic views both from Cadbury Hill and across the moors. With its mixture of lanes, footpaths and the bridleway, there are many attractive corners and vistas to delight walkers, cyclists and horse riders. Employment [FIGURES IN THE EMPLOYMENT SECTION ARE FROM THE ORIGINAL REPORT IN 2000] Local employment can be important in a village. It reduces the need to travel by car or public transport, thereby cutting down on pollution and congestion. It can also provide opportunities for part-time work for those with family commitments.  However, against that, businesses pull employees into the village from outside the area, increasing local traffic. Delivery lorries on narrow country lanes can cause damage to the infrastructure. Certain types of business can cause both noise and environmental pollution.  Claverham Ltd, situated at Court de Wyck, are part of a multinational organization. Claverham Ltd is well established in the village, having moved on to the site in 1980. The land was previously owned by The Imperial Tobacco Co. & prior to that was a tannery. [This factory has now closed and planning permission is being sought for 75 homes]. The village has several other businesses, a small industrial estate, engineering companies and some builders. There are also ten farms, three horticultural establishments and a retirement home.  Apart from agriculture, the major employer in Claverham in the 1851 census was the Court de Wyck Tannery, which employed seven local people. Today out of a workforce of 380, Claverham Ltd, on the same site, employs only five local people. [This factory has now closed]  As in 1851, the highest local workforce is still in agriculture and horticulture, with some 34 people involved. The other major employers are the three shops and the six building firms. Court de Wyck Primary School employs 12 local people but a further 17 come from outside the village.  The 35 businesses surveyed in the village showed that out of a combined workforce of 547 employees, only 101 come from the village. Interestingly, the 1851 census showed that there were 39 different occupations in the village at that time involving 143 people. Transport & Travel There is easy access, by car, to Bristol and Weston via the A370 and the M5 motorway. The area is also served by buses. A train station in Yatton provides services to Bristol, Weston and beyond, while five miles away is Bristol International Airport. Of concern is the increase in the number of vehicles in the area and the speed of traffic in the village and around the lanes. Claverham Road is becoming increasingly dangerous for parents walking their children to school. Leisure Leisure facilities in the village have improved since the opening of the Village Hall in 1999. Prior to that most village events were held in the Church Room, adjacent to St Barnabas Church - a second- hand wooden hut which was opened in 1920, closed in 1986 and has since been demolished - however this was not suitable for the majority of indoor games.  As well as providing a venue for various exercise classes, the new hall is marked out for badminton and Claverham Village Hall could be available for table tennis and other activities, if there is enough interest and appropriate clubs are formed. However, in the village there is limited scope for outdoor games, such as football, and villagers have to travel to Cleeve or Yatton for such activities. Claverham Cricket Club, which draws members from a wide area, is situated outside the village boundary in Yatton. The other popular activities are walking, cycling and horse riding. As well as the lanes round lower Claverham, the area is richly served with footpaths. However there is only one bridleway, which leads from Chapel Lane to Cadbury Hill and Cleeve. Youth Facilities [no idea whether this section is still current]. Most people agree there should be more facilities for the youth of the village, but, there are a variety of views as to what form these should take and where these facilities should be. Some people feel that because of vandalism, no more facilities should be provided at all. There were also fears expressed in the survey, that extra facilities would attract teenagers from outside the village. Because the equipment has been largely removed from Broadcroft Playing Fields the younger age group needs a safe play area with swings etc. The parish council has money earmarked for this. However, the older teenagers need more space for ball games etc. Currently many teenagers attend the Yatton Youth Club in Rock Road. Claverham Youth Project, which was set up in December 2000, is trying to raise money for an all weather sports court. The group has been busy fundraising and has collected over £200 from discos and car washing. They have also secured £1,000 of funding from the Police. Now they need an area of land on which to build the sports court. [no idea whether this project is still ongoing]. Other youth groups such as Scouts, Cubs, Guides and Brownies, are well supported and have their own hall. Facilities for the Elderly and Disabled All the public places, such as the shops, hall and churches are accessible to the disabled, but the narrow, discontinuous  pavements make it difficult for wheelchair access both round the village and between Claverham and Yatton. With no doctor or dentist in the village it is often difficult for the elderly to get to these facilities, the nearest being in Yatton. There is a Community Bus service run by the Lions, which takes people from Claverham to Yatton on a Thursday. Yatton Carers also provide transport to local hospitals, doctors, etc. Conclusion There's no doubt that Claverham is a great place to live. There is a thriving community spirit, which enabled a new village hall to be built. This in turn has brought back many of the village activities, which were lost when the Church Room was condemned. These include the Harvest Supper, the Senior Citizens tea party, the country market and various other entertainments. We still have our Post Office [now a cafe], [now closed though there is currently a cafe open on some days in the village hall] Claverham Stores has changed to a pizza takeaway but we still have Melanie's the hairdressers. There is a primary school and pre-school playgroups. CONGRATULATIONS IF YOU HAVE REACHED THIS POINT ON THE PAGE AND THANK YOU FOR READING IT ALL!
Claverham Court
Court de Wyck Chapel
Claverham Drove
Top of High Street
View up High Street from The Crossroads cl909 (Picture Courtesy of Richard Whittaker)
View along High Street towards St Barnabas Church - early 1900's (Picture courtesy of Memories, St Nicholas Market, Bristol)
Rose Farm
Home Farm, Lower Claverham
Chestnut Farm, Lower Claverham
Sweet Briar Cottages
St Barnabas Church
Friends Meeting House
Curved Wall at Walnut Bank
Yew Tree House, prior to renovation Whitehouse Road Yew Tree Cottages after the renovation
Claverham Drove Under Water
Streamcross Farm
Old orchard
Dew Pond at Hillsea
Hedges in Meeting House Lane
Trees at Claverham House
View from Cadbury Hill
Horse riding, a popular activity
Claverham Village Hall
A booklet was produced in 2000-2001 which was the result of a comprehensive survey of the village in order to produce a Village Character Statement. Much of content is shown below but please bear in mind that this was a document from the turn of the century. It’s a long page but just scroll down to read it all……………….

ABOUT CLAVERHAM

Claverham is a small village located just off the A370, half way between Bristol and Weston super Mare, Somerset, in the UK. Claverham has a Neighbourhood Plan (2016-2026) which you can view HERE Future developments involving Claverham are discussed HERE There is also a Facebook Group HERE If you search Wikipedia for “Claverham” you get re-directed to a page about Yatton but it does contain some basic information about the village.
The Village The village is centred on the High Street where there is a Post Office [now closed], Claverham Stores [now a Pizza Takeaway] and Melanie's Hairdressers; and the adjoining Bishops Road where there is a Primary School and a village hall. St Barnabas Church is at the top of the High Street and the Free Church is situated in Claverham Road, a few hundred yards from the cross roads. This cross road, formed by the High Street, Chapel Lane, Bishops Road and Claverham Road is believed to be the site of the ancient Stalling's Cross - the market cross for Court de Wyck. (The former Chapel is thought to stand on the original site). Stalling's Cross may have been corrupted to become Stream Cross. Originally a farming hamlet, the village acts as a home to many commuters. However, it still retains its rural heritage and is surrounded by farms, horticultural businesses, market gardens and a small riding school. It is this patchwork of farms, fields, footpaths and winding lanes that gives Claverham its character. As with many villages in North Somerset, Claverham has a mixture of old local families and new arrivals. History Claverham is probably named after the clover fields which surrounded the village. In the West Country, the word 'ham' does not refer to a village or settlement, but is a contraction of the word 'hamm' meaning meadow. It is situated roughly half way between Weston-super-Mare and Bristol on the plain between the rivers Kenn, to the north, and Yeo to the south. Claverham is roughly five miles from the Bristol Channel as the crow flies. The village has two distinct geological sections. To the south Cadbury Hill, a limestone ridge, partly overlaid with clay, rises to some 250 feet. The rest of the area is a mixture of peat, estuarine alluvium and low hills of sand and gravel. The former swampy areas between Hillsea, Claverham Court and Claverham Road were drained by an interconnecting series of rhynes in the 1700s. The underlying geological structure has determined the development pattern of the village - but it is the impact of man, allied to the natural environment, which has given the surrounding countryside its patchwork of fields, hedges, walls and rhynes. Formation of the Village Claverham has probably been inhabited from Stone Age times when the moors would have been used for fishing and wild fowling. Trenches cut in the 1970s at Kenn revealed pieces of wood thought to have come from a track-way across the swamp. A Romano-British pot was found south of the railway line at Hillsea and Saxon pottery has also been found in the area. Although not strictly speaking in Claverham, there was a Roman Temple and an Iron Age Fort on Cadbury Hill. Prior to the Roman period (around 45AD) the area was mainly used for grazing, fishing and hunting. Drainage systems put in by the Romans, however, established a suitable environment for agriculture. Early history is sketchy. Before 1066 Claverham was held by Gunhilda. After the Norman Conquest it was held by the Bishop of Bath and Wells. At the time of the Doomsday survey, 'Claverham' was home to one Lord, one slave, three villagers and twelve smallholders. By 1450 there were 14 farms. The village was originally in two hamlets or tithings. The tithing of 'Claverham' was the area now known as Lower Claverham and centred round Claverham Court, while the High Street area was called 'Week' and centred round Court de Wyck. More recently, a third hamlet has grown up in the Stream Cross area. Claverham Court, originally the old Court House, now a farm, was built in the 15th century or possibly even earlier. A medieval two-light stone window still exists at the back of the hall. The house has a historic 17th century park and gardens. To the east of the house stands the original 15/16th century Tythe Barn, with its central cart entry and weathered buttresses. Nearby is a purpose built sheep wash. The original Court de Wyck was built before 1338. Between 1660 and 1670 it was enlarged and at the beginning of the 18th century it was considered one of the most magnificent properties in the area. However by 1814 it was virtually uninhabitable and was pulled down leaving only the l4th century chapel and the tythe barn intact.  The tythe barn was converted into a tannery in 1840. In 1970 it was taken over by The Imperial Tobacco Co. and its trademark tall chimney, a landmark for miles around, was demolished in the mid- 1970s. The barn was twice gutted by fire - in 1898 and 1928. After the latter fire the south fascia was reconstructed from the original stone. Opposite the original entrance to Court de Wyck was the farmhouse of Bishop's Farm, first recorded in 1799 as being let to Edward Ash. By 1821 the present house had been built in the "homeground". Over the next 200 years farm houses and cottages were slowly added, but the next major change came with the drainage of the low lying, peaty land between Claverham Court and Little River. In 1750/1 a private agreement led to the early enclosure of some 200 acres at Claverham Common. The enclosure was allocated to people in proportion to the number of shares (or grazing rights) they held on the Common. The area known as Hare Mead, some 32 acres, was made into a Decoy Pool. The land was divided into fields enclosed by rhynes, which act as boundaries, watering for livestock and a drainage system. The Parliamentary Enclosure Act caused further drainage to take place. During 1810-1815 Kenn Moor was drained to the west of Kenn Moor Gate (there literally was a gate here). It was at this time that the droves, including Claverham Drove (originally called Claverham Road) were laid out across the moors. Because of the peat foundation, the roads are laid on faggots, which gives them their characteristic springy feel. The census of 1851 shows there were 71 dwellings in the village and 14 farms. Out of 476 inhabitants a quarter were employed in farming. A few were coal miners, who may have worked down the Claverham mine. There were two shops - a butchers and a general store. Although there was no inn there was a beer house keeper near Claverham Green Farm and a cider house keeper at Mead Mills at the end of Hunt's Lane. The picture "The top of the High Street" shows the area as it is today, compared with the picture the early 1900's shown earlier. Eighteen properties were situated between Cottage Farm at the top of the High Street and Streamcross Villa. Several remain including Court de Wyck Cottages. Historic Properties Claverham is richly endowed with historic properties. Claverham Court is believed to be the earliest building still existing, but this and some of the other farms were probably built on the sites of even older properties. They include: Rose Farm in Stream Cross, was originally a medieval house with an open hearth. The ceiling, fireplace and stairs were probably added in the l6th century. Home Farm (formerly Foord Farm) A 15th century single storey open hall house, with the smoke escaping through a hole in the thatched roof. The blackened roof timbers still remain, but the thatched roof was replaced in the mid 20th century. Ceiling, fireplaces and stairs were added in the l6th century. Lower Farm (formerly Old Farm), Jasmine Lane. This property dates from mid l6th Century, is built on the same plan and construction as Home Farm and Rose Farm. Jasmine Lane was originally called Old Farm Lane. Grove Farm, Brockley Way, is late l6th/early 17th century with later alterations and additions. It is built of stone and has two large, external chimneystacks. The gable porch has a very old studded front door with raised hinges and the doorframe has been cut to allow barrels to be taken into the house. Claverham Green Farm, Brockley Way: The date on the chimney is 1721, but it is probably of an earlier construction with 19th century alterations. Built of stone and rendered, the roof is pantiled with brick chimneys. Claverham House, Stream Cross: Built in 1744 with mid 19th century alterations, it is built of stone with a limestone dressing. It has an interesting 19th century porch with pilasters on pedestals. In the 18th century gardens there is a ha-ha, as have at least three other properties in the village. A ha-ha is a ditch, often with a low wall inside it, which divides areas of land and forms a barrier to animals without interrupting the view. Chestnut Farm, Lower Claverham, The earliest part is mid 17th century. It was refronted in the 18th century and has early 19th century alterations. Built of stone and rendered, it has a pantiled roof and a fine studded door with hinge straps. Manor Farm, Stream Cross, appears to be early 17th century, but the hall and stairs in a turret could mean an earlier date. Built of stone and rendered, with a pantiled roof and gabled chimneystacks, it has 18th century alterations. Oakfield, Meeting House Lane: Built in the early 17th century, it was remodelled in the 18th century and the rear wing was added in the early 19th century. Construction is stone and render. Cottage Farm, Brockley Way: Built before 1800 of stone and rendered, the front has recently been cleared of render and re- pointed. Originally a single thatched building, it has been added to at the front and rear. In the 19th century there was a coalmine behind the house. The shaft reappeared during the last war but was filled in to prevent accidents. White Cottage, Jasmine Lane: An early 19th century front, probably of a much older building, with 20th century alterations. Attached at an angle and incorporated into the house is a former pigsty. The house is stone, rendered and painted white with a pantiled roof. The Post Office, High Street: 19th century with the main door originally opening at the side onto the road. Stone and rendered. Sweet Briar Cottages, Lower Claverham: Older than 1650, when the deeds show the property changed hands. Stone and rendered. Streamcross Villa, Claverham Road: Probably late 18th century (shown on a survey map of 1799). It is one of the oldest properties on Claverham Road. Until fairly recently it was a general shop. Stone built and rendered. Churches The earliest known church (or free chapel), which was dedicated to St Swithin, was built near Claverham Court before 1326. All traces of the building disappeared in the l600s, but it is thought to have been built on the field called Chappie Hays. The Friends Meeting House, in Meeting House Lane, was built on a half-acre plot given to the Friends by Richard Dawson in 1673. This was at a time when persecution of the Quakers was intense. After the Act of Toleration the Friends obtained a licence to hold meetings in a named Meeting House. By 1729 the numbers had grown and the House was rebuilt and extended to create an attractive natural stone property. (In that same year one of the Friends, Richard Durban left a bequest in trust for a school in Yatton for poor children). In 1932 the property was given to the Friends Historical Society to administer. In 1991 a Claverham Trust was set up to buy back the property and undertake a major building project including re-rendering the outside. Behind the property is a burial ground. The Methodist Church at the end of Chapel Lane was built in 1867 It was closed in 1972 and converted into two properties in 1978. St. Barnabas Church, which was originally called the Mission Room and Busy Bee, was built in 1879 on land donated by John Cox and family. A daughter church of St Mary's, Yatton, it was opened to counter the three 'public houses' in the remoter parts of Claverham. The Free Evangelical Church at the corner of Streamcross was built in 1927 - only eight months after parishioners, who did not agree with the Minister at the Methodist Church, decided to form their own group. A clubroom was later added at the rear. Barns and Walls The village is also rich in old farm buildings, barns and walls made of local stone. Mellowed over the centuries, they add to the texture of the village. The tythe barn at Claverham Court is 15th/l6th century construction, 17 metres long and stands 7 metres high. A variety of buildings at Rose Farm show the transition from local stone used in the 18th and 19th centuries to the brick ones of the early part of the 20th century. At Chestnut Farm, the range of natural stone buildings, which Include a cider house, run along the side of the road for 80 metres. Several redundant barns have been converted to attractive homes, thus preserving them. The new village hall has been built in the style of a Somerset barn to ensure it blends in with the adjacent historic buildings. There are also many 'stand alone' stonewalls, the most important being those at Claverham House, Court de Wyck, Walnut Bank and 'Parman'. The curved garden wall at Walnut Bank is probably the highest at three metres. The walls adjoining the chapel at Court de Wyck are probably the oldest in the village. There are several walled gardens in Claverham. Although the garden wall at Green Farm has been demolished, the wall outside the refurbished Yew Tree Cottages has been rebuilt using the original stone. Up until 1900 the majority of properties in the village were built of dressed stone or limestone rubble and render, with gables. Recently the render has been removed from some properties and the stonework re-pointed. Development The modern development in the village started in the 1930's with local authority housing along Claverham Road. These followed the traditional style of render and gables. Further local authority housing followed in Broadcroft Avenue, then around twenty years later in Claverham Park. Again they followed the village style. The last local authority homes to be added were the retirement bungalows in 1984, but this time they were brick built. The first private housing developments started in the 1960s. Over the next ten years, Whitehouse Road, Hollowmead Close, Franklin's Way, Chestnut Drive, Dunsters Road and Anvil Road were built. These have followed a variety of styles and are mainly of brick or imitation natural stone. None of these estates exceeded 35 in number and the ten-year time scale allowed them to be absorbed into the village. In 1997 five dark red brick houses in Orchard Court were built. This is a sensitive site right in the heart of the village. Originally the developers wanted to pull down the three derelict cottages known as Yew Tree House, which dates from the l6th century or earlier. However villagers felt that this would destroy the character of the High Street and after a sustained campaign the planners agreed they should be retained and renovated. Strikingly, individual houses which have been built over the past five years, have stuck to the village style of rendered cottage. There are a wide variety of properties along Claverham Road and the High Street; all built at different times and with varying styles, however, several incorporate gables. Natural Environment The attractive network of lanes, bridleways and footpaths, which allows access to the countryside surrounding the village, is one of the reasons why so many people like living in Claverham. Most properties either look out onto fields or are within easy reach of them. Apart from Claverham Road, all access roads to the village are through farmland. Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI): The moors are more than an attractive place to walk - they are a vital conservation area on our doorstep. The importance of the natural flora and fauna of the moors was recognized in 1995 when a large area - from Nailsea Wall across Kenn Moor to the railway line - was designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The local area has undergone many changes since the end of the last ice age. Changes in sea levels have laid down layers of silt and peat. Clay occurs to the west of the area, and in some places this has become mixed with the peat. The varying soil types and farming practices, along with the drainage systems, have resulted in a wide range of rhynes and ditches, each supporting exceptionally rich plant communities such as Frogbit and Unbranched Bur-reed as well as the nationally scarce Hairlike and Fern Pondweed and Whorled Water-milfoil. Many emergent species are also present such as Tubular Water-dropwort and the Flowering Rush. In some places the brackish nature of the area, before drainage, is still reflected in some of the plants such as Club-rush and Grey Club- rush. Some of the less frequently dredged ditches are dominated by extensive stands of yellow Iris, Reed Sweet Grass and Common Reed while the banks support Ragged Robin, Marsh Marigolds and Creeping Jenny. There is an equally diverse invertebrate fauna, many of them now nationally rare, including the Hairy Dragonfly and the Variable Damselfly, Britain's largest Water Beetle - the Great Silver Water Beetle - the Pea Mussel and the Soldier Ply. Amphibians such as frogs, toads and newts all breed in the area along with reptiles such as grass snakes and slow worms. Of the bird population, the Bewick Swans and herons predominate, but curlews, skylarks, lapwings, kestrels, buzzards, mallards, moorhens and the occasional kingfisher can all be seen, as well as sea birds, woodpeckers, blackbirds and song thrushes (though these are sadly in decline). Mammals include foxes, badgers, rabbits, hares, grey squirrels, roe deer, and bats. The complex web of ditches drain into the Little River, Westmead Rhyne, Blackditch Rhyne and Claverham Rhyne (Tan Ditch). These are connected to the River Kenn and Blind Yeo via Claverham Drove Rhyne and Decoy Pool Rhyne. The management of this diverse habitat is finely balanced and current practice has evolved over several generations of drainage engineers, farmers and, more recently, conservationists (the water- logged structure of the Inner Moors is of archaeological interest as these conditions preserve organic remains of wood and leather). In the past, those holding rights of common on Kenn Moor were obliged to maintain the rhynes and rivers and they could be fined for neglecting their duties or damaging the banks. Alterations to the water table can have extreme effects such as in the summer of 1896 when between 200 and 300 acres of land sank. Cracks 20-30 yards long and holes 3-4ft deep and 7ft across appeared. This was blamed on Chelvey Pumping Station abstracting too much water. To counteract this a dam was built on the River Yeo at Wemberham to hold back the water on the moors. There was also a pumping station in Chapel Lane. Given the current trend towards wetter winters and the consequent high water table, anything that would add to the potential for flooding should be avoided. Farms It must not be forgotten that the fields are a green factory. Cattle and sheep predominate in this area. There are dairy farms and beef and sheep rearing ones. Some cereal crops are grown, but fields are mainly cut for hay and silage. There are also agricultural contractors some of whom farm as well. There are concerns that if farms cease to remain viable there will be increased pressure to allow building or further industrial development. Orchards have also been diminishing. Some have been removed including one at Court de Wyck, others have died off and not been replaced. One remains near Oakfield, which still produces apples and also provides a habitat for the Green and Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers as well as owls. New orchards are being planted. A cider apple orchard has been replanted on land at Brockley Way where the old cottage stood, and a small orchard has been planted at Walnut Bank. Ponds Ponds provide an important habitat for flora and fauna as well as acting as natural reservoirs for excess water. There are more than 15 ponds and pools in Claverham. Many are natural but several have been man-made, either to provide drinking water for livestock, a habitat for wildlife or as a water feature. These include one created ten years ago by Clevedon Gun Club on marshland between Walnut Bank and the railway line. More recently a wildlife pond has been created at Court de Wyck School. There are two ponds at Hillsea one of which is a dew pond. Ponds at Claverham Green Farm were used by drovers who stayed overnight to rest and water their animals and also for washing purposes - hence the name 'washing pound'. Several ponds have been filled in, some deliberately others by natural processes. The decoy pool near Little River which was created in 1750 is not shown on the 1841 Tythe Map, but five fields have the word Decoy Pool in their names. Bungalows now cover the duck pond in the High Street. The bog and adjacent marshland in Chapel Lane have also been filled in. The loss of these natural reservoirs, which allow excess rainwater to seep away slowly, could be a contributory cause of flooding such as that seen at the end of Chapel Lane in 2001. The loss of the only bog area in Claverham has also denuded the village of important wildlife. Trees Nothing enhances a landscape more than trees. Although there is no large area of woodland in the village it is rich in trees - not only in hedgerows and fields, but in private gardens as well. One of the major changes to the look of the landscape has been the loss of thousands of majestic Elms due to Dutch Elm disease. Semi-mature elms are still being lost today. However Claverham still has many native trees, with ash and oak predominating on the higher ground, while pollarded willows line the rhynes on the moors. Several specimen trees already have Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs) on them. These include 13 trees at Court de Wyck (Claverham Ltd) namely a lime (which replaced a pine), Scots Pines, Sycamores, Horse Chestnuts (two of which were planted by the daughters of the Millwards 90 years ago) and a Holm Oak. The land also supports Copper Beech, Walnuts, Somerset Firs, a 30-year-old Magnolia, 60- year-old Mulberry and a Ginkgo Tree as well as the usual Ash etc. In the High Street, a Willow and Silver Birch have TPOs, and a Lime is included in a landscape order at Ivy Cottage. There is also a TPO on a Walnut Tree in Claverham Park. Other important trees include eleven Walnut trees at Claverham Court and the Chestnut tree at Grove Farm, which is a third generation from a specimen tree between Henley Lane and Cadbury Country Club. Hedges Hedges not only act as boundaries to fields and form wildlife habitats but they are living connections to the past. To former generations, hedges were of great importance as a source of food, fuel and medicine as well as acting as a shelter to livestock and crops, a soil stabilizer and a windbreak.  Forming a complete wild life eco-system, half of our native mammals, all of our reptiles and a fifth of the bird population can be found in the hedgerows. Over a thousand species of wild flowers can also be found there - more varieties than in woods or on heath lands.  Hedges still predominate in Claverham as boundaries to fields and farms as well as edges to lanes. Remnants of these field hedges can also be found in some of the residential areas.  Once a hedge has been created it is totally sustainable, enduring year after year and increasing in diversity, and it is this diversity which provides a clue to its origins. It has been calculated that the number of shrub species per 30-yard hedge is roughly equal to its age in hundreds of years.  The hedge alongside the road at Walnut Bank has been verified as having Tudor origins from the number of species in it.  Many of the other hedges date back to the time of the Enclosure Acts of the 18th and 19th centuries.  Part of the hedge in Meeting House Lane contains small leaf Lime, which is a living link with Mesolithic times. A sticky, woodland tree, which is not normally used in hedges, it is an indicator of a 'woodland ghost' where the hedge has been formed from trees growing in the original forest which covered the area.  At one time hedges were closely protected and raids on them by parishioners were severely punished and could carry the penalty of transportation.  Until 20 years ago, hedges were managed in a sustainable way by hand. Cutting and laying ensured strong new growths. However, modern practices of annual flaying by mechanical cutters can kill a hedge. Disease can enter through the jagged tears and the mulch of debris at the base of the hedge can stop new growth. Open Spaces The only open space in the centre of the village is the Broadcroft Playing Field. Just outside the village fence is Cadbury Hill, part of which is jointly managed by Yatton and Congresbury Parish Councils. The nearest large open spaces are at Hangstones, Yatton and Cleeve playing fields. Claverham enjoys a diversity of scenic views both from Cadbury Hill and across the moors. With its mixture of lanes, footpaths and the bridleway, there are many attractive corners and vistas to delight walkers, cyclists and horse riders. Employment [FIGURES IN THE EMPLOYMENT SECTION ARE FROM THE ORIGINAL REPORT IN 2000] Local employment can be important in a village. It reduces the need to travel by car or public transport, thereby cutting down on pollution and congestion. It can also provide opportunities for part-time work for those with family commitments.  However, against that, businesses pull employees into the village from outside the area, increasing local traffic. Delivery lorries on narrow country lanes can cause damage to the infrastructure. Certain types of business can cause both noise and environmental pollution.  Claverham Ltd, situated at Court de Wyck, are part of a multinational organization. Claverham Ltd is well established in the village, having moved on to the site in 1980. The land was previously owned by The Imperial Tobacco Co. & prior to that was a tannery. [This factory has now closed and planning permission is being sought for 75 homes]. The village has several other businesses, a small industrial estate, engineering companies and some builders. There are also ten farms, three horticultural establishments and a retirement home.  Apart from agriculture, the major employer in Claverham in the 1851 census was the Court de Wyck Tannery, which employed seven local people. Today out of a workforce of 380, Claverham Ltd, on the same site, employs only five local people. [This factory has now closed]  As in 1851, the highest local workforce is still in agriculture and horticulture, with some 34 people involved. The other major employers are the three shops and the six building firms. Court de Wyck Primary School employs 12 local people but a further 17 come from outside the village.  The 35 businesses surveyed in the village showed that out of a combined workforce of 547 employees, only 101 come from the village. Interestingly, the 1851 census showed that there were 39 different occupations in the village at that time involving 143 people. Transport & Travel There is easy access, by car, to Bristol and Weston via the A370 and the M5 motorway. The area is also served by buses. A train station in Yatton provides services to Bristol, Weston and beyond, while five miles away is Bristol International Airport. Of concern is the increase in the number of vehicles in the area and the speed of traffic in the village and around the lanes. Claverham Road is becoming increasingly dangerous for parents walking their children to school. Leisure Leisure facilities in the village have improved since the opening of the Village Hall in 1999. Prior to that most village events were held in the Church Room, adjacent to St Barnabas Church - a second-hand wooden hut which was opened in 1920, closed in 1986 and has since been demolished - however this was not suitable for the majority of indoor games.  As well as providing a venue for various exercise classes, the new hall is marked out for badminton and Claverham Village Hall could be available for table tennis and other activities, if there is enough interest and appropriate clubs are formed. However, in the village there is limited scope for outdoor games, such as football, and villagers have to travel to Cleeve or Yatton for such activities. Claverham Cricket Club, which draws members from a wide area, is situated outside the village boundary in Yatton. The other popular activities are walking, cycling and horse riding. As well as the lanes round lower Claverham, the area is richly served with footpaths. However there is only one bridleway, which leads from Chapel Lane to Cadbury Hill and Cleeve. Youth Facilities [no idea whether this section is still current]. Most people agree there should be more facilities for the youth of the village, but, there are a variety of views as to what form these should take and where these facilities should be. Some people feel that because of vandalism, no more facilities should be provided at all. There were also fears expressed in the survey, that extra facilities would attract teenagers from outside the village. Because the equipment has been largely removed from Broadcroft Playing Fields the younger age group needs a safe play area with swings etc. The parish council has money earmarked for this. However, the older teenagers need more space for ball games etc. Currently many teenagers attend the Yatton Youth Club in Rock Road. Claverham Youth Project, which was set up in December 2000, is trying to raise money for an all weather sports court. The group has been busy fundraising and has collected over £200 from discos and car washing. They have also secured £1,000 of funding from the Police. Now they need an area of land on which to build the sports court. [no idea whether this project is still ongoing]. Other youth groups such as Scouts, Cubs, Guides and Brownies, are well supported and have their own hall. Facilities for the Elderly and Disabled All the public places, such as the shops, hall and churches are accessible to the disabled, but the narrow, discontinuous  pavements make it difficult for wheelchair access both round the village and between Claverham and Yatton. With no doctor or dentist in the village it is often difficult for the elderly to get to these facilities, the nearest being in Yatton. There is a Community Bus service run by the Lions, which takes people from Claverham to Yatton on a Thursday. Yatton Carers also provide transport to local hospitals, doctors, etc. Conclusion There's no doubt that Claverham is a great place to live. There is a thriving community spirit, which enabled a new village hall to be built. This in turn has brought back many of the village activities, which were lost when the Church Room was condemned. These include the Harvest Supper, the Senior Citizens tea party, the country market and various other entertainments. We still have our Post Office [now a cafe],  [now closed though there is currently a cafe open on some days in the village hall] Claverham Stores has changed to a pizza takeaway but we still have Melanie's the hairdressers. There is a primary school and pre-school playgroups. CONGRATULATIONS IF YOU HAVE REACHED THIS POINT ON THE PAGE AND THANK YOU FOR READING IT ALL!
Claverham Court
Court de Wyck Chapel
Claverham Drove
Top of High Street
View up High Street from The Crossroads cl909 (Picture Courtesy of Richard Whittaker)
View along High Street towards St Barnabas Church - early 1900's (Picture courtesy of Memories, St Nicholas Market, Bristol)
Rose Farm
Home Farm, Lower Claverham
Chestnut Farm, Lower Claverham
Sweet Briar Cottages
St Barnabas Church
Friends Meeting House
Curved Wall at Walnut Bank
Yew Tree House, prior to renovation Whitehouse Road Yew Tree Cottages after the renovation
Claverham Drove Under Water
Old orchard
Dew Pond at Hillsea
Hedges in Meeting House Lane
Trees at Claverham House
View from Cadbury Hill
Horse riding, a popular activity
Claverham Village Hall
A booklet was produced in 2000-2001 which was the result of a comprehensive survey of the village in order to produce a Village Character Statement. Much of content is shown below but please bear in mind that this was a document from the turn of the century. It’s a long page but just scroll down to read it all……………….

ABOUT CLAVERHAM

Claverham is a small village located just off the A370, half way between Bristol and Weston super Mare, Somerset, in the UK. Claverham has a Neighbourhood Plan (2016-2026) which you can view HERE Future developments involving Claverham are discussed HERE There is also a Facebook Group HERE If you search Wikipedia for “Claverham” you get re-directed to a page about Yatton but it does contain some basic information about the village.
PAULINEMADETHIS Most of the bags in the shop are individual, one-off creations and many of them are made using upcycled fabrics in order to keep a happy environment. They are all hand signed. A percentage of all sales will be donated to charity. The charity for this year is the Bristol Children's Help Society (Registered charity number 1092921). So please click HERE to take a look at my shop where purchases can be made via the secure PayPal system. PaulineMadeThis is regularly at the Claverham Market in the village hall.
© 2018 - click here for T&Cs